NAMM 2024: GPU Audio - Vienna Power House / Living Sky

US Highly detailed reverb spaces with reduced CPU cost      25/01/24

At NAMM 2024, we caught up with Bill Collins from GPU Audio to discuss their latest developments. The focus was on their groundbreaking partner product with Vienna Symphonic Library – MIR Pro 3D. Matt explained that MIR Pro is a 3D soundstage reverb with heavy CPU processing, but with the ability to offload that to the GPU, providing a significant performance boost. The product, available now, allows users to switch between CPU and GPU power, offering a substantial increase in performance, particularly advantageous for complex projects with large track counts.

In addition to MIR Pro 3D, Bill hinted at another exciting collaboration, this time with Mantra. Brian De Oliveira, the CEO of Mantra, joined the conversation to introduce their joint project, Living Sky. This innovative product aims to revolutionize the use of convolution and fifth-order ambisonics, creating dynamic, living, breathing spaces in a way never seen before. While the product is in the early stages, Brian shared their vision of reverb as a spatial tool and instrument, rooted in a decade of experience in video game production. The interfaces, both 2D and 3D, promise a creative and intuitive approach to spatial sound. Stay tuned for more updates on Living Sky, expected to be ready by mid-year.

Vienna Power House Price: 165 Euros

https://www.gpu.audio/




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